Air-Drying vs. Blow-Drying Hair & Damage

Air-Drying vs. Blow-Drying Hair & Damage

How many people let their hair/locks air dry under the misguided assumption that you are really doing it a favor? However, according to the scientific community, this is completely wrong!

But does blow-drying damage hair? Does air drying damage hair? 

We'll begin our story in the bathroom. Why? Because, according to research, that's where the damage to your hair begins. Water is the most difficult substance for our hair to handle, perhaps more so than heat.

According to recent research, letting your hair air dry damages it. If you use the right distance and temperature of a hairdryer, it might not be as bad for your hair as leaving it to dry on its own.

But first, what are the specifics of air drying and blow-drying?

 

Air dry hair

Air-Drying

There are several benefits to air-drying your hair. You may save time and money and give your hair a much-needed rest from blow-drying.

When it comes to the long term, is air-drying one's hair beneficial or detrimental to your health? You'll get a slew of different responses if you search for this question on Google.

When it comes down to it, your hair texture will play a major role in whether or not you need to air-dry your hair.

 

Is air-drying harmful to your hair?

As a result of air-drying, your hair retains more moisture for longer periods of time. However, even while this seems to be a beneficial thing for your hair, long-term use may be harmful to your hair health.

Celebrity hairdresser Takisha Sturdivant-Drew, the owner of the TSD hair extension brand, suggests that air-drying is most effective when the hair is moist, but she warns against doing so when it is completely saturated with water. Longer wet hair periods cause swelling and breakage, which leads to brittle ends and a lot of flyaways.

Those claims are backed up by research done in 2011. Hair that was air-dried had greater damage in its cortex than hair that had been heated.

Some hair types are more vulnerable to this than others.

According to Shaun Pulfrey, inventor of the Tangle Teezer and a hairstylist, "Thick hair may absorb a huge amount of water and become more susceptible to damage since hair is relatively weak when wet." In contrast, fine hair is less prone to absorbing water and, hence, is less vulnerable to this damage.

 

Hair that benefits from air drying:

Air-drying works best on hair that is fine, curly, wavy, thin, straight, or colored.

People with this kind of hair may benefit from air drying since it doesn't involve heat and isn't directly on the scalp, adds Sturdivant-Drew.

Alternatively, if you do have thick, coarse, or relaxed hair or kinky hair, you may wish to protect it first by using a protective product. This will keep your hair from drying out.

 

best sellers

HAIRFINITY Candilocks Chewable Hair Vitamins
Rated 5.0 out of 5
Based on 92 reviews
Hairfinity
HAIRFINITY Candilocks Chewable Hair Vitamins
HAIRFINITY DHT Blocker
Rated 5.0 out of 5
Based on 8 reviews
Hairfinity
HAIRFINITY DHT Blocker
HAIRFINITY Healthy Hair Vitamins
Rated 4.9 out of 5
Based on 6344 reviews
Hairfinity
HAIRFINITY Healthy Hair Vitamins

Tips for Air-Drying 

Most people are aware that air-drying their hair takes time. Swelling occurs as a result of water in your hair. It takes a long time for your hair to completely air dry, which means that the proteins that keep your hair in place are under additional strain. To avoid hair breakage, it's best to avoid excessive stress.

It's also possible that you'll be inclined to massage your hair, possibly with a towel while air-drying it. Your hair will be stripped, broken, and fried as a result of this abrasion. Instead of rubbing the water from your hair with your hands or cotton towel, use a t-shirt or a silk towel to squeeze out the water.

As anybody who has ever tried to air-dry their hair knows, it can be a real pain in the neck. Brushing damp hair may strain the strands, resulting in breakage and damage to your hair's delicate cuticles, making it more prone to damage and split ends. 

Going outdoors without brushing your hair can cause your hair to tangle, which increases the risk of split ends even more. Using a comb in the shower instead of a brush is the best method to prevent frizz and tangles in your hair.

Even though it's tempting to leave your damp hair out in the cold when you're short on time, you should avoid this during the harsh winter months. Breakage is likely if your hair becomes solidly icy. When it's freezing outdoors, try and ensure that your hair is thoroughly dried before venturing out! 

 

Mom blowdrying her child's hair

Blow-Drying

Hairdryers are an important part of almost every woman's daily regimen. Using a hairdryer is a simple and effective way to get a sleek, shaved appearance. You almost certainly own a blow dryer and use it daily.

Even though they have a lot of benefits, blow-dryers can damage your hair, making it dry, frizzy, and sometimes split.

But what's the most worrisome aspect of blow-drying? Hair dryer causing hair loss is a terrible thing to hear, but this essay will teach you just how to avoid it.

 

Is It Safe To Blow Dry Your Hair?

It's easy to believe that hair dryers promote hair loss due to their high temperature, but it's not that simple. The most vulnerable part of the body is the head, which absorbs the lion's share of the blow.

Although most people aren't aware, a blow dryer's temperature may get to as high as 500 degrees Fahrenheit.

Your hair will be stripped of its natural oils if you use this much heat. Because of this, your hair is considerably more susceptible to breaking or cracking. Even worse, high heat may cause inflammation of the scalp and weakening of the hair roots, resulting in hair thinning.

In other words, does using a hairdryer lead to hair loss? This isn't true, but it does facilitate hair thinning.

The awesome news is that you can stop this from happening by following these tips. 

 

How to Prevent Hair Damage from Blow-Dryers

Although blow-dryers may cause damage to your scalp and hair, there may be a few basic actions you can take right now to avoid (or minimize) the consequences of blow-drying:

  1. Use A Cooler Temperature

As we've previously discussed, damage, as well as hair loss, may result from excessive heat exposure. A cooler setting on your hairdryer is the simplest way to reduce the amount of heat that comes into direct contact with your hair. Even if your blow-dryer is on low or medium, you can still finish the task.

  1. Don't Point the Blow-Dryer at the Roots of Your Hair

A lot of people make this error. At all costs, safeguard your roots as well as your scalp. To avoid drying out your scalp, focus your blow-dryer on the ends of your hair. Natural oils from your scalp will keep your hair nourished all day.

  1. Don't Spend Too Much Time On a Spot

This is one of the fastest methods to eliminate all of the water from your scalp and hair. Keeping the hair dryer pointed in the same location for an extended period may cause your hair to overheat. This may cause severe burns to your hair and scalp, as well as lasting scarring and damage. Don't hold your hairdryer in one place for too long; instead, move it from side to side. If necessary, make additional passes through your hair.

  1. Using the Blow-Dryer Less Frequently

Avoid using your hairdryer as often as possible. If you can, take a break from using heat styling equipment whenever you can. There's no guarantee that your hair won't be hurt.

To be fair, this may be asking a lot, especially if you're a person who relies on a blow-dryer to get through the day.

  1. Use Heat-Protecting Products On Your Hair

Hairstyling gadgets like blow dryers or even curling irons may damage your hair if they aren't protected with heat-protectant solutions. While they can't halt all the damage, these creams and sprays do a good job of slowing it down. Just apply the product evenly to your hair. It will hydrate and shield your hair from the sun's harmful rays. Try HAIRFINITY Revitalizing Leave-In Conditioner, which can reduce hair breakage by up to 84% after just one use.

If you have thin hair, you should always keep these suggestions in mind while using a blow-dryer. Hair loss may be hastened by using a blow dryer. However, if you pay attention, you can prevent it.

 

Is air drying or blow drying better for your hair?

best sellers

HAIRFINITY Gentle Cleanse Shampoo
Rated 4.9 out of 5
Based on 122 reviews
Hairfinity
HAIRFINITY Gentle Cleanse Shampoo
HAIRFINITY Balanced Moisture Conditioner
Rated 4.9 out of 5
Based on 68 reviews
Hairfinity
HAIRFINITY Balanced Moisture Conditioner
HAIRFINITY Strengthening Amino Masque
Rated 4.9 out of 5
Based on 135 reviews
Hairfinity
HAIRFINITY Strengthening Amino Masque
HAIRFINITY Nourishing Botanical Oil
Rated 4.9 out of 5
Based on 406 reviews
Hairfinity
HAIRFINITY Nourishing Botanical Oil

What does an expert have to say?

There is a lot of confusion when it comes to using a hairdryer vs. letting your hair dry naturally. As a result, consulting a professional is the best course of action. 

Dr. Ajay Rana, dermatologist, and aesthetic physician went on to discuss hair structure and what is ideal for your needs. Below is what he had to say about it:

Keratin, a protein found in hair, builds the hair's cuticle. These cuticles have a shingle-like structure to them. That's why, without any physical damage or loss of moisture, the cuticle will stay intact. There are several hair-drying techniques available nowadays, which might damage our cuticles. 

Blowing or using heat on the hair is unhealthy while air-drying it, on the other hand, is beneficial. To dry hair naturally, you don't need any type of instrument, hence it's referred to as "air drying," he said.

Air-drying allows the hair and scalp to retain moisture for hours at a time, allowing for a more natural look and feeling. However, this might lead to bacterial overgrowth on the scalp, compromising the health of the scalp. 

Dryness, as well as frizzy ends, may result from blow-drying damp hair. Using a brush to tug and blow-dry the hair may also cause breaking and lengthening of the hair. After a certain point, the hair becomes brittle.

It's advised to use a lower setting if you love using a blow dryer. Allow the rest of the moisture in your hair to dry naturally so that it keeps its natural form and feel. 

The best way to prevent frizz, tangles, and knots in your hair is to blow dry it mostly on the scalp and then comb and style it with a medium-temperature blow dryer. Blowing your hair in a direction away from your scalp can also help seal the moist cuticles for a stronger seal and a shiny appearance.

 

Final Thoughts

Finally, it's up to you whether or not you like air drying or prefer heat styling, and whatever technique you choose to use every day. Even though air drying your hair isn't inherently harmful, you should consult with a stylist or do more research on your hair type if you want to do it correctly. You shouldn't have to worry about something as basic as drying your hair.